Jude Milhon/en

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Jude Milhon
JudeMilhon.jpg
General information
Born 12 March 1939
Birthplace Washington D.C.
Died 19 July 2003

Jude Milhon (Born in Washington D.C, 12th March 1939 – 19th July 2003), better known as St.Jude, was a hacker and author resident in San Francisco.

Biography

She spent most of her childhood and adolescence in Anderson, Indiana, where actively participated in favor of civil rights. She began programming after reading a book titled “Teach Yourself Fortran”. Milhon coined the term cypherpunk and was a founding member of cypherpunks, an association that grouped defenders of digital privacy. She was a member of the Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility Association.

Personal life

She worked as a programmer in a vending machine company for the Horn and Hardart self-services in Manhattan, but soon joined the California hippy exodus and settled in Berkley, where she began encouraging other women to join the emerging cyber culture, which she described as a “community of revolutionary leftist programmers”. This built first public network system , the legendary Memory Community project in 1973. In the 90’s, she became editor-in-chief of the anarchist and technological magazine Mondo 2000. In a 1999 interview, she described piracy as “martial art, a way of defense against politically correct politicians, excessively intrusive laws, fanatic and narrow-minded people of all tendencies”. She also defended actions based on an intelligent way to elude limits, whether imposed by governments, the laws of physics. The network was its place of experimentation and personal discovery as simple and little implemented as unknown gender identity. At the end of 90’s, Milhon continued working as web designer and Internet consultant. Her fight and rebellion have gone down in history of hacker philosophy summarized in a famous interview published in 1995 by Wired News. She also defended actions based on an intelligent way to elude limits, whether imposed by governments or the laws of physics. The network was its place of experimentation and personal discovery as simple and little implemented as unknown gender identity. In the late 90’s, Milhon continued working as a web designer and Internet consultant. Her fight and rebellion have gone down in history of hacker philosophy summarized in a famous interview published in 1995 by Wired News.

Books

She is the author of several books, including The Cyberpunk Handbook (1995, The Manual of Cyberpunk), and with R.U.Sirius, How to Mutate and Take Over the World (1996), with whom she also founded and edited the Mondo 2000 technological culture-magazine, in which Milhon worked as editor-in-chief until her death. In 1994 she published a book for those women who wanted to start hacking, trying to demystify the network, entitled “Hacking the Wetware: The Nerd Girls Pillow-book”.

One of her most famous phrases was: When you are in cyberspace, nobody knows what your gender is

See also

References